Pulling from a piece series- what type of rug to put with art?

Finding rugs to go in your home - and fit with your art- can be torture. I’m not a fairy godmother who can come in and sprinkle some dust to create the perfect rug for your room (wouldn’t that be amazing?!), but I am going to focus on how rugs can connect with your art. This is just one way that you can integrate your artwork with your home.

1. Neutral (including any natural fiber rug and animal prints)

Photo courtesy of Katie Rosenfeld

Photo courtesy of Katie Rosenfeld

Neutral rugs are best when you have a lot of color going on in your art and in the rest of the room. This room by Katie Rosenfeld has lots of beautiful patterns and colors going on, and having a neutral rug balances it all out. If she had a large oriental or something else, it would visually make your eye go all over without having a break (visually speaking) and you would get overwhelmed looking at it. Another reason why people use neutral rugs, is to add to a softer,  soothing design. An example of this would be if you had pencil drawings or photography and you wanted your room to remain "quiet" feeling. 

2. Oriental

Photo courtesy of Barrie Benson

Photo courtesy of Barrie Benson

Oriental rugs are great to pair with art that have a lot of other colors in it (which is most art pieces). Especially if you want to pull more colors out of the art/rug to use in the rest of the room. All you need is 1-2 colors that are both in the rug and the piece of art. I love this room because you can see how the rug picks up distinctly on the art and all the accessories in the room. In fact if I had to guess, I don’t know what came first- the art or the rug. That’s the way it should be.

3. Geometric (stripes and chevrons go in this category too)

Design by An Organized Nest and Tricia Roberts Design

Design by An Organized Nest and Tricia Roberts Design

Since these rugs can be bold (black and white stripes) or have a quieter look- like the picture above- they can give your room/art different feels. However, they are great if you want the rug to take the back seat in the design. Similarly to neutral rugs, these types of rugs give texture and some pattern to the room but don’t become the center of attention. If you want your furniture and your art to be the where your eye goes to first, then geometric rugs are a great option.

4. Abstract

Photo courtesy of Elle Decor

Photo courtesy of Elle Decor

I would describe abstract rugs as rugs that are usually patterns (even ombre´) that might even look completely different in one area. These rugs can look so different that I would suggest using them if you can pick up the pattern that they use in your art. This room’s rug has this spot pattern, which is also in the painting. That is the easiest way to incorporate an abstract rug. Another option would be to use the rug as a contrast with the artpiece and have the colors in the rug be in the rest of the room, but not connect to the piece. This is an example of that.

5. No Rug

Photo courtesy of Studio MRS

Photo courtesy of Studio MRS

This design choice is helpful if you have pets, kids etc. and just don’t want to deal with a rug. However, if you decide to go this route, I would highly recommend having a colored paint color on the wall (and maybe a color on the chair cushions) that connects to your piece. I wrote about that here. It’s also a personal choice- sometimes people feel like the room looks unfinished without one. So, do what works for you and don’t feel like you have to have a rug if it’s just best you don’t deal with one right now. This room is very clean and I think designer Michelle R. Smith decided that she wanted the wood planking to show and that with the size of the room, it was better without one.

Special note about gallery walls: They can go with any of these options. Your rug should be based more on what your style is and the rest of the furniture in your room. So if you’re wanting a cleaner look, then a neutral rug. If you want to connect your gallery wall with your grandmother’s secretary desk you have in the corner, then an oriental would be best. Gallery walls are great for being flexible with design choices.

I hope these are helpful in looking for rugs that fit with your art and your room. However, if you’ve been struggling with rugs for awhile this article is especially helpful in dealing with the whirlwind of emotions that can come from searching forever.

 

Do you have a rug that you feel like works with your art? Or do you have an existing rug but now don’t know what art that goes with it?